Posts Tagged 'nature'

Skeleton & Flesh

New large installation works are in progress for John D’Agostino’s ongoing series Empire of Glass, found in 2012′s body of work, “Skeleton & Flesh”, based on the forgotten fragments of Favrile glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany rescued in the Great Depression.

/ Comments Off

Skeleton & Flesh

New large installation works are in progress for John D’Agostino’s ongoing series Empire of Glass, found in 2012′s body of work, “Skeleton & Flesh”, based on the forgotten fragments of Favrile glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany rescued in the Great Depression.

/ Comments Off

The Quest of Beauty

One of America’s most acclaimed artists, Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) embraced virtually every artistic medium, from stained glass windows, lamps and mosaics, to pottery, metalwork, interiors and enamels. Tiffany used the medium of glass to challenge the pre-eminence of painting. In glass, Tiffany found a medium of endless possibilities that expressed his love of light and color.

/ Comments Off

The Quest of Beauty

One of America’s most acclaimed artists, Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) embraced virtually every artistic medium, from stained glass windows, lamps and mosaics, to pottery, metalwork, interiors and enamels. Tiffany used the medium of glass to challenge the pre-eminence of painting. In glass, Tiffany found a medium of endless possibilities that expressed his love of light and color.

/ Comments Off

The Significance of Light

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) was the English Romantic landscape painter par excellence, and a dramatist of light. Turner’s genius lies in his recognition of the significance of light as more than just an optical phenomenon or parlor trick for atmospheric heroics. Light is not “present” in his paintings, in so much as it is a singular, haunting presence.

/ Comments Off

The Significance of Light

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) was the English Romantic landscape painter par excellence, and a dramatist of light. Turner’s genius lies in his recognition of the significance of light as more than just an optical phenomenon or parlor trick for atmospheric heroics. Light is not “present” in his paintings, in so much as it is a singular, haunting presence.

/ Comments Off